Category Archives: US State Department

New Australia-U.S. push deals India in to Pacific | The Australian

THIS week’s 60th anniversary Ausmin meeting in San Francisco deserves the overworked adjective historic. It marks a pivot point in which the US and Australia begin to redefine their region not as the Asia-Pacific, but as the Indo-Pacific.

U.S -Australia and India Ausmin PACT: The technologies are cyber warfare, missiles and nuclear weapons. The external nations are China, India and North Korea.

The addition of cyber war was the most important change in the scope of the alliance since New Zealand left in the mid-1980s. In a communique on cyber security, Australia and the US declared: “In the event of a cyber attack that threatens the territorial integrity, political independence or security of either of our nations, Australia and the US would consult together and determine appropriate options to address the threat.”

via New Australia-U.S. push deals India in to Pacific | The Australian.


United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission

The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission was created by the United States Congress in October 2000 with the legislative mandate to monitor, investigate, and submit to Congress an annual report on the national security implications of the bilateral trade and economic relationship between the United States and the People’s Republic of China, and to provide recommendations, where appropriate, to Congress for legislative and administrative action.

Announcements

9/12/11

Extramural Research Opportunity Offered by the Commission

The Commission has publicized a new request for proposals (RFP) for an original research study pertaining to issue areas in the Commission’s statutory mandate. The RFP has also been publicized on the website Federal Business Opportunities (www.fbo.gov), with an effective date of Sep. 9th, 2011 and a deadline for receipt of proposals set for Oct. 3rd, 2011. All interested contractors are invited to submit proposals, although the contractor must be registered in the federal Central Contractor Registry (CCR) prior to the award of any contract. The research project is as follows:

Research Report on Chinese Investments in the United States (FBO solicitation USCC-022)

Any questions regarding these projects or the Commission’s procedures for contracted research should be directed to: John Dotson, Research Coordinator for the Commission. Telephone: 202-624-1482 / E-mail: jdotson@uscc.gov.

9/12/11

The Commission has released a new staff research report entitled China’s Foreign Assistance in Review. The report details trends in Chinese foreign assistance, including the amount and goals of such funding, whether it meets international aid standards, and its role in major MDBs.

8/31/11

OPEN MEETINGS FOR THE 2011 ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW-EDITING SESSIONS AND RELEASE OF FINAL ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS 

Click here to read the final notice of open meetings dates, times and locations.

8/4/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing on The Implications of China’s Military and Civil Space Programs is now available.

Read the transcript here.

7/22/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing on China’s Five Year Plan, Indigenous Innovation, and Outsourcing is now available.

Read the transcript here.

7/20/11

The Commission has released a new staff research report entitled The Confucian Revival in the Propaganda Narratives of the Chinese Government. The report details how elements of Confucian philosophy have been revived in official propaganda as part of a larger effort to build ideological support for the ruling Chinese Communist Party. The report also describes some of the ways in which Confucius is being promoted as an icon of China’s traditional culture to both domestic and international audiences. The report concludes that the promotion of selected Confucian teachings is an attempt to provide a pillar of support for authoritarian and paternalistic politics in China, while also presenting a gentler humanist face to audiences both at home and abroad.

7/6/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing on China’s Intellectual Property Rights and Indigenous Innovation Policyis now available.

Read the transcript here.

7/1/11

The Commission has released a backgrounder entitled The Chinese People’s Liberation Army Delegation Visit to the United States, May 2011: A Summary of Key Actors and Issues. The backgrounder provides an overview of the recent PLA delegation to the United States that marked the restoration of the U.S.-China military-to-military relationship. Participants, site visits, official bilateral agreements and controversial points are discussed.

6/30/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing on Chinese State-Owned Enterprises and U.S.-China Bilateral Investmentis now available.

Read the transcript here.

6/27/11

The Commission has released a new backgrounder entitled China’s 12th Five-Year Plan. The backgrounder provides an overview of China’s most recent five-year plan, including its special characteristics, key targets, and new industrial initiatives such as the seven strategic emerging industries. The backgrounder also includes expert analysis and critical assessment of China’s 2015 objectives.

6/22/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing on China’s Foreign Policy: Challenges and Players is now available.

Read the transcript here.

6/16/11

The agenda, testimonies, video, and other information from the Commission’s June 15th hearing on China’s Five-Year Plan, Indigenous Innovation and Technology Transfers, and Outsourcing have been posted.

6/3/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing on China’s Narratives Regarding National Security Policy is now available.

Read the transcript here.

5/31/11

The Commission has released a backgrounder entitled China in Latin America. The backgrounder provides an overview of China’s growing economic and political ties to Latin America over the past ten years. It examines China’s current trade relationship with countries in the region, the scope and nature of China’s foreign direct investment, the extent of its diplomatic, military, and regional organization engagement, and its interaction with Latin American countries that officially recognize Taiwan as an independent country.

5/10/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing and roundtable on China’s Internal Dilemmas is now available.

Read the transcript here.

5/5/11

The Commission has released the agenda for its May 11th hearing on “Implications of China’s Military and Civil Space Programs.”

See the press release for details.

4/27/11

The Commission has released the agenda for its May 4th hearing on “China’s Intellectual Property Rights and Indigenous Innovation Policy.”

See the press release for details.

4/20/11

The Commission has released a new report entitled China’s Program for Science and Technology Modernization: Implications for American Competitiveness, which examines China’s national science and technology programs, assesses linkages between China‘s science policy, its industrial policy and its defense-industrial complex, discusses the methods commonly employed by the PRC to support its scientific modernization through interactions with the United States, and addresses the implications of these programs for US competitiveness.

4/8/11

The USCC hearing on China’s Foreign Policy: Challenges and Players is scheduled to take place on Wednesday, April 13th. In the event that a budget resolution has not been reached by 6 PM on Monday, April 11th, and the government is still shut down, the hearing will be postponed to a later date.

4/6/11

The Commission has released the agenda for its April 13th hearing on “China’s Foreign Policy: Challenges and Players.”

See the press release for details.

3/30/11

The Commission has released a new report entitled Going Out: An Overview of China’s Outward Foreign Direct Investment. The paper provides an overview of China’s outward foreign direct investment (ODI), including the rationale behind Chinese ODI, its character and scope, the role of Chinese government in Chinese investment activities, and implications for the United States.

3/28/11

The Commission has released the agenda for its March 30th hearing on “Chinese State-Owned Enterprises and U.S.-China Bilateral Investment.” 

See the press release for details.

3/24/11

The transcript from the USCC hearing on China’s Active Defense Strategy and its Regional Impact is now available.

Read the transcript here.

3/22/11

The Commission has released a new report entitled Ready for Takeoff: China’s Advancing Aerospace Industy

Click here to read the press release.

3/17/11

The Commission has released a new report entitled The Evolving Role of China in International Institutions. 

Click here to read the press release.

3/3/11

The Commission has released the agenda for its March 10th hearing on “China’s Narratives Regarding National Security Policy.”

See the press release for details.

2/8/11

Extramural Research Opportunity Offered by the Commission

The Commission has publicized two new requests for proposals (RFP) for original research studies pertaining to issue areas in the Commission’s statutory mandate. The RFPs have also been publicized on the website Federal Business Opportunities (www.fbo.gov), with an effective date of Feb. 7th, 2011 and a deadline for receipt of proposals set at Feb. 28th, 2011. All interested contractors are invited to submit proposals, although the contractor must be registered in the federal Central Contractor Registry (CCR) prior to the award of any contract. The research projects are as follows:

Research Report on China’s State-Owned Enterprises and State Capitalism (FBO solicitation USCC-020)

Research Report on Patterns in U.S.-China Bilateral Investment (FBO solicitation USCC-021)

Any questions regarding these projects or the Commission’s procedures for contracted research should be directed to: John Dotson, Research Coordinator for the Commission. Telephone: 202-624-1482 / E-mail: jdotson@uscc.gov.

2/1/11

Extramural Research Opportunity Offered by the Commission

The Commission has publicized a new request for proposals (RFP) for an original research study pertaining to issue areas in the Commission’s statutory mandate. The RFP has also been publicized on the website Federal Business Opportunities (www.fbo.gov), with an effective date of Jan. 24th, 2011 and a deadline for receipt of proposals set at Feb. 9th, 2011. All interested contractors are invited to submit proposals, although the contractor must be registered in the federal Central Contractor Registry (CCR) prior to the award of any contract. The research project is as follows:

Research Report on China’s Space Program (FBO solicitation USCC-019)

Any questions regarding these projects or the Commission’s procedures for contracted research should be directed to: John Dotson, Research Coordinator for the Commission. Telephone: 202-624-1482 / E-mail: jdotson@uscc.gov.

1/19/11

The Commission has released the agenda for its January 27th hearing on “China’s Active Defense Strategy and its Regional Impacts.” See the press release for details.

1/14/11

Commissioner Larry Wortzel (Ph.D) is scheduled to testify before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs at 10:30 am on January 19th in room 2200 of the Rayburn House Office Building at the briefing Assessing China’s Behavior and its Impact on U.S. Interests.
Read his oral and written testimonies here.

1/11/11

The Commission has announced its first three hearings of 2011:

  • China’s Active Defense Strategy and its Regional Impact – January 27
  • China’s Internal Dilemmas (Hearing and Roundtable) – February 25
  • China’s Narratives Regarding National Security Policy – March 10

For more information, please see our 2011 Hearing Schedule.

1/11/11

The USCC releases a new report, The National Security Implications of Investments and Products from the People’s Republic of China in the Telecommunications Sector.

Click here to read the press release.

12/16/10

The Commission has announced its leadership for 2011.

Click here to read the press release.

11/17/10

Today, the Commission releases its 2010 Annual Report to Congress.  Click here to view the Report.

Click here to read Chairman Daniel Slane and Vice Chairman Carolyn Bartholomew’s opening remarks from the press conference. 

Click here to read the press release.

11/10/10

The Commission will release its 2010 Annual Report to Congress on November 17, 2010 in the Russell Senate Office Building, Room 485 at 10:00am.

Read our press release here.

10/04/10

The Commission will hold its fifth 2010 Annual Report Review Session in Room 233 of The Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, NW from 10:00 AM to 4:30 PM on October 12, October 13, and October 14, 2010.

These sessions are open to the public. Please contact Kathy Michels at kmichels@uscc.gov or (202) 624-1409 if you have any questions.

  • Opening Statement of Chairman Daniel M. Slane (PDF)
9/28/10

Transcript of the July 14 Hearing on The Challenge of China’s Green Technology Policy and Ohio’s

Read the Transcript (PDF)

9/22/10

Transcript of the June 30 Hearing on China’s Information Control Practices and the Implications for the United States

Read the Transcript (PDF)

9/22/10

On September 22, 2010 Commissioner Michael Wessel testified in a House Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs in a hearing: “Made in the USA: Manufacturing Policy, the Defense Industrial Base, and U.S. National Security.”

Read his testimony here.

9/2/10

Transcript of the June 9, 2010 Hearing on Evaluating China’s Past and Future Role in the World Trade Organization

Read the Transcript (PDF)

8/4/10

The Schedule for the Commission’s 2010 Annual Report writing and review meetings are noted below. Each session is open to the public and will be held at 444 North Capitol Street, NW, Hall of The States, Washington, DC 20001:

  • August 11-12 10:00 am to 4:00 pm Conference Room 233
  • September 14-15 10:00 am to 4:00 pm Conference Room 233
  • September 29-30 9:30 am to 4:00 pm Conference Room 231
  • October 12-14 9:30 am to 4:00 pm Conference Room 233
  • November 17 Official Release of Annual Report – Location on Capitol Hill will be announced

Please contact Kathy Michels at 202-624-1409 or via email at kmichels@uscc.gov if you have any questions.

7/29/10

Notice for USCC Website Regarding New Research Contracts

Extramural Research Agreements Awarded in 2010 by the Commission The Commission has awarded contracts to three organizations to perform research studies pertaining to issue areas identified in the Commission’s statutory mandate. The contracts were awarded after competitive evaluation by the Commission’s research committee of proposals that responded to the Requests for Proposals issued by the Commission. They were awarded upon approval by the full Commission. Contracts are now active for all three of these projects as follows:

  • CENTRA Technology, Inc.: Research Report on the National-Level Science Programs of the People’s Republic of China (contract signed May 28th, initial draft expected September 2010)
  • RAND Corporation: Research Report on Developments in the Aerospace Industry of the People’s Republic of China (contract signed July 2nd, initial draft expected October 2010)
  • Economic Strategy Institute: Research Report on the Role of China in International Organizations (contract signed July 6th, initial draft expected October 2010)

Questions may be directed to: John Dotson, Research Coordinator for the Commission. Telephone: 202-624-1482 / E-mail: jdotson@uscc.gov.

7/28/10

Transcript of the May 20, 2010 Hearing on “China’s Emergent Military Aerospace and Commercial Aviation Capabilities”

Read the Transcript (PDF)

6/3/10

Transcript of the April 8, 2010 Hearing on “China’s Green Energy and Environmental Policies.”

Read the Transcript (PDF)

4/22/10

Transcript of the March 18, 2010 Hearing on “Taiwan-China: Recent Economic, Political, and Military Developments across the Strait, and Implications for the United States.”

Read the Transcript (PDF)

10/22/09

RELEASE OF RESEARCH REPORT ON “CHINESE CYBER WARFARE & ESPIONAGE”: The Commission has approved for public release a contracted report entitled: Capability of the People’s Republic of China to Conduct Cyber Warfare and Computer Network Exploitation.

The government of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) is a decade into a sweeping military modernization program that has transformed its ability to fight high tech wars. A major element of this modernization effort, known as informationization, is guided by the doctrine of fighting “Local War Under Informationized Conditions,” i.e., the People’s Liberation Army’s efforts to develop a fully networked architecture capable of coordinating military operations on land, in air, at sea, in space and across the electromagnetic spectrum…” [Read THE PDF REPORT]

The Commission contracted with Northrop Grumman Corporation to produce this report on the basis of a competitive contract awarded in March 2009. Questions regarding this Report or the Commission’s procedures for contracted research should be directed to: John Dotson, Research Coordinator for the Commission. Telephone: 202-624-1482 / E-mail: jdotson@uscc.gov.

via United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission.


China Attacks USA 4 years ago

Four (4) years ago Scientific America wrote an article about “China Cyber Attacks Signal New Battlefield is Online”. In 2011 we have seen a surge in China’s hacking but why did we not prepare for this when we knew about it for so long. In 2007 they hacked the UK, France and the US. In the article it stated, “China’s military goals are to improve its ability to wage information warfare”. See China Cyber Timeline.

The Chinese were ahead of us back in 2007 and we did nothing about our cyber security. We are arresting young people with no criminal records living in the basements of mom and dad for hacking. How many Chinese have we arrested for hacking, what’s our US-China Trade Statistics? US-China -273.1?  I understand in 2007 we were fighting a war to stop Iraq from deploying WMD (Weapons of Mass Destruction). 

We found no WMD in Iraq, but the Chinese were working on offensive cyber weapons to cripple business, communication, power grids and financial services in the USA and this cyber weapon is not classified as a WMD.

Let me get it straight the Chinese have been working in cyberspace since 2007 to learn how to re-route the world’s internet traffic thru it’s borders and steal terra-bytes of data. While we develop a kill switch to cut off the entire Internet by the President. I understand KISS (Keep it Simple Stupid) If someone is attacking you thru cyberspace we simply kill all the connection to the outside world. Quarantine the infected systems and then reboot and the USA is back online, cut of from the rest of the world an isolationist dream. This sounds so much like the cold-war fatalistic dogma.

USCyberlabs

why_hackers_attack_diagram

We can do better than this and everyone can help. If we want to stay on top of cyberspace we need a baseline security standard to be applied to all .gov .edu and all critical C&C (Command & Control) infrastructure. Once the baseline is set we need to adapt and be proactive in our cyber security to be changed quickly to be adaptable to new threats. We need to develop cyber-monitoring capabilities to be able to see cyber attack vector profiles and react quickly. We also need a National disaster recovery plan to ensure recovery in case of an attack. I might ad a cyber forensic team to analyze the attacks and find the bad guys. Last but not least a comprehensive plan to go after the Nation, State, group, corporation or individuals that caused us harm.

Most of this technology exist a lot of it is open-source (free) with a few modifications it can provide a basic infrastructure framework to build on. We need to break the ties to political special interest government contracts to corporation. We need to be adaptable our technology to the changing cyber sphere faster that we have been. We do this by training our future cyber warrior with programs like the Air Force Cyber Patriot Program. There are 10 of thousans if not more of security savvy people here in the good old USA. These people have no real certificate or college degree in Information Security (but who reallybut they know hacking and security. I bet they would volunteer to help America build the tools and infrastructure that’s needed. You have no idea what the open-source community can do, when you get the best geeks in the country to solve a problem.

Once we have everything in place and it works, let’s share the basic model with the world. Let’s prove democracy in cyberspace can work. Let’s show the world we are leaders again. America is still one of the leaders of the free world, let’s work together in cyberspace and help cyber freedom-free speech democracy become real.

us cyber labs


Abraham Lincoln said ”of the people, by the people and for the people” It worked for America why not apply this right to “Cyberspace”.

The Arab Spring this year was history the first cyber revolution. The Libyan people have been freed from tyranny and unjust at the hands of Gaddafi without a conventional army, it has change the world. The people of the Arab States with the use of cyberspace, Twitter, Facebook, Crowd Map, computers, game console’s, cell phones, satellites and other technology made their voices heard. The dreamers that created social networks companies must feel very proud they have changed the world as we know it. Does anyone know how many lives were saved during the first cyber revolution? The destruction of conventional modern war even an internal revolution leaves scars on the country, infrastructure but most important, it leaves a scar on the people and children’s very soul. I know I was one. Our technology, cyberspace, the Internet, the Web saved a generation of children from the cruelty and horrors of war. We American should be proud of the world we help create we saved lives. We also scared the people in power. When a regiene is toppeled by people using nothing more than a cell phones leaders get a little bit worried and maybe the’ll do a better job. 

As I watch the political debate about the Debt Ceiling Bill and the lack of do nothing but toot my own “political” horn. This political game is why the Chinese are almost ahead of us in cyber space and stealing our stuff and manufacturing electronic components with backdoor to the Internet. Wake up American let’s educate our public officials to the freedom of speech on the Internet, lets VOTE. Let’s make sure our Senators and Congressman understand and educate them on Cyber Security (I can supply some links –write me). I’m a veteran and I don’t like wars, but if you’re going to put me in the warzone (Let me borrow this from Ms. Palin) “Don’t Retreat, Instead Reload”. Civilian Militia now live in Cyberspace look at the Jester’s war against Lulzsec the current  Hacktivist cyber war. (Ex-Military “Good Hacker” Identifies LulzSec Leader “Sabu”). This war is live on social networks feeding news organizations around the world. LOL  

Cyberspace belongs to the people. We the people need to keep it free and open, let’s not wait another 4 years to be better at information warfare.

My 2© cents – gatoMalo_at_uscyberlabs_dot_com

http://USCyberLabs.com/blog/

http://ChinaCyberWarfare.wordpress.com

http://HacktivistBlog.wordpress.com/

via China’s Cyber Attacks Signal New Battlefield Is Online: Scientific American.2007

via US Cyber Labs – Blog.


China’s cyber abilities worry U.S.: spy chief facing a cyber threat

China’s growing capabilities in cyber-warfare and intelligence gathering.

http://www.reuters.com/resources_v2/flash/video_embed.swf?videoId=211488490


Spies From China Use the Internet to Exploit Weaknesses in U.S. – The Daily Beast

Defense Department officials are struggling to plan for a massive
 cyber-attack from Beijing – and fend off spies in the meantime. Tara McKelvey reports on the secret warfare.

 Deputy Defense Secretary William Lynn III never said the word China 
in his speech on Thursday
 about “Cyber Strategy,” but he didn’t have to. The
 threat of a cyber-attack from Beijing weighs heavily on the minds of 
military commanders. And while officials have not said publicly who
 was behind the newly disclosed theft of 24,000 files from a defense contractor in 
March, one of the worst cyber-assaults in Pentagon history—
it may well have been a Chinese operation. And even if Beijing
 officials were not involved in the theft, they have been implicated in 
other matters—so many, in fact, that federal officials are
 discussing publicly what do to about cyber-attacks, without saying
 explicitly who their number-one villain is.



 

via Spies From China Use the Internet to Exploit Weaknesses in U.S. – The Daily Beast.


Critical Infrastructure Vulnerable to Holes in Chinese SCADA Software | threatpost

The U.S. CERT has issued a security advisory firms using industrial control systems software from the Chinese firm Sunway in the U.S. after a researcher discovered remotely exploitable holes that could be used to knock out or take control systems running the company’s software. The ICS-CERT, the Computer Emergency Readiness Team for the industrial control sector, issued an advisory on June 14 after heap overflow vulnerabilities were discovered in Sunway’s Force Control and pNetPower products by NSS Labs researcher Dillon Beresford.

via Critical Infrastructure Vulnerable to Holes in Chinese SCADA Software | threatpost.


United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission

U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission’s report on the “Capability of the People’s Republic of China to Conduct Cyber Warfare and Computer Network Exploitation.”

The U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission was created by the United States Congress in October 2000 with the legislative mandate to monitor, investigate, and submit to Congress an annual report on the national security implications of the bilateral trade and economic relationship between the United States and the People’s Republic of China, and to provide recommendations, where appropriate, to Congress for legislative and administrative action.

via United States-China Economic and Security Review Commission


Wolf: Technology shared too freely with China – Washington Times

A senior House Republican wants to hold the Obama administration accountable for what he says are violations of law limiting the sharing of space technology with China.

Rep. Frank Wolf

 

 

 

 

 

Rep. Frank R. Wolf, chairman of the House Appropriations subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science and related agencies, said in an interview that a law passed in April restricts technology-sharing with China following attempts by Chinese hackers to steal government secrets.

via Wolf: Technology shared too freely with China – Washington Times.


U.S. China face vast divide on cyber issues | Reuters

Two super powers have opposing views as to what shape security on the Internet should take!

WASHINGTON – For two years, academic experts from the United States and China have quietly held talks on cyber-security, straining to establish rules of the road in a realm that has proven a persistent irritant between the world’s two largest economies.

The informal discussions have yielded modest progress in areas such as cooperation to combat Internet fraud, where both Beijing and Washington have an incentive to work together, according to participants.

Click to Enlarge
AFP/Getty Images
Chinese anti-terrorism police undergo a drill in Suining, southwest China’s Sichuan province. After setting up its own cyber-warfare team, China’s military has now developed its first online war game aimed at improving combat skills and battle awareness, state press said. China and the U.S. have contrasting views on cyber security. Photo: Getty Images

China’s contrasting view of cyber security was made clear as soon as the United States began discussing the need to protect computer networks, James Mulvenon, a China expert at the Defense Group Inc, told a recent Washington conference.

China wanted to talk about censorship “The Chinese came back immediately and said no, no, no, we want to talk about information security, which is both protecting the network and policing the content on the network,” Mulvenon said.

“Right from the outset, we were talking past one another,” he asaid.

Digital attacks and cyber snooping on U.S. technology firms and government agencies including the Pentagon, many of them believed to have originated in or been routed through China, have pushed cyber-security up the list of thorny issues troubling Sino-American relations.

While Beijing denies it, U.S. officials and experts suspect China’s hand was behind the hacking and phishing of web-search giant Google Inc. this year and last, as well as intrusions into Pentagon networks.

On Thursday, the Pentagon is due to release its formal cyber-security strategy.

Unlike nuclear, chemical and biological weaponry, or trade wars, there are no existing international treaties that cover cyber-war, computer espionage or hacking.

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, an architect of the U.S. opening with China in the 1970s, told a Thomson Reuters event last month that a high-level agreement between the two sides is needed. “If you take it case by case it will lead to accusations and counter-accusations,” he said.

But so far, there has been relatively little official movement.

The annual cabinet-level U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue included cyber security for the first time this year, but the session was just 90 minutes long, cut in half by translation and produced no breakthroughs.

The unofficial talks between experts began after China approached the United States with concerns that hacker intrusions were stoking bilateral tension, said James Lewis, a cybersecurity expert who leads the U.S. side of the talks.

The U.S. group and experts from the state-affiliated China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations have covered four areas: law enforcement, trade, military issues and espionage.

Five group meetings and three smaller informal meetings have made headway in the law enforcement area, said Lewis, of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think tank.

In one instance, the FBI helped China’s law enforcement agencies by staging raids in New York on Chinese in the United States who were defrauding people back home, he said.

“It’s slow, but I think there’s a little bit of progress,” said Lewis, adding that the goal is to eventually hand the conversations over to official negotiating teams.

But the military and espionage tracks have been hard going, highlighting what analysts say is a huge U.S.-China perception gap over values, capabilities, interests – and even basic definitions of deterrence and cyber security.

Analysts say China’s People’s Liberation Army believes its ability to attack U.S. cyber infrastructure compensates for its conventional military weakness compared to the United States.

“I’m quite skeptical of the likelihood that any effective understanding of offensive operations can be reached with the Chinese government,” said Stewart Baker, a former U.S. Department of Homeland Security official, now at the law firm Steptoe & Johnson.

China’s eagerness to acquire foreign technology also has inspired cyber intrusions that anger trade partners.

Hackers based in China have been accused of trying to steal everything from Google’s valuable search algorithm to manuals for U.S. satellites to gigabytes of proprietary business information from Western energy companies.

But China’s spymasters, paradoxically for a centrally controlled government, do not keep a tight leash on hackers and others that they train, said Lewis, whose group will hold its next round of unofficial cyber-security talks later this year.

Lewis said he was skeptical that Beijing was directing the high-value intellectual property theft or could stop it.

“They do train people and they do use proxies but that doesn’t mean that everyone is under their control,” he said.

Even if the United States could verify that China was behind malicious cyber activity and Beijing had the capacity to rein it in, negotiations toward a cyber treaty might require concessions Washington would be loathe to put on the table.

Jack Goldsmith, an international law and cyber-security expert at Harvard Law School, says China and other countries would likely demand U.S. restraint in areas such as intelligence gathering and encouraging political activists who challenge curbs on Internet freedom.

“Until the United States gets serious about which concessions that are attractive to our adversaries it is willing and able to make, American talk of a cyber-arms agreement is empty,” Goldsmith wrote recently.

via telegraphjournal.com – U.S., China face vast divide on cyber issues | Reuters – Breaking News, New Brunswick, Canada.


U.S. and China face vast divide on cyber issues | Reuters

(Reuters) – For two years, academic experts from the United States and China have quietly held talks on cyber-security, straining to establish rules of the road in a realm that has proven a persistent irritant between the world’s two largest economies.

The informal discussions have yielded modest progress in areas such as cooperation to combat Internet fraud, where both Beijing and Washington have an incentive to work together, according to participants.

But mostly, the talks appear to have exposed a wide gap between the United States and China over almost everything virtual: policing computer networks, moderating cyber warfare, even controlling information.

China’s contrasting view of cyber security was made clear as soon as the United States began discussing the need to protect computer networks, James Mulvenon, a China expert at the Defense Group Inc, told a recent Washington conference.

China wanted to talk about censorship. “The Chinese came back immediately and said no, no, no, we want to talk about information security, which is both protecting the network and policing the content on the network,” Mulvenon said.

“Right from the outset, we were talking past one another,” he added.

Digital attacks and cyber snooping on U.S. technology firms and government agencies including the Pentagon, many of them believed to have originated in or been routed through China, have pushed cyber-security up the list of thorny issues troubling Sino-American relations.

While Beijing denies it, U.S. officials and experts suspect China’s hand was behind the hacking and phishing of web-search giant Google Inc. this year and last, as well as intrusions into Pentagon networks.

On Thursday, the Pentagon is due to release its formal cyber-security strategy.

Unlike nuclear, chemical and biological weaponry, or trade wars, there are no existing international treaties that cover cyber-war, computer espionage or hacking.

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, an architect of the U.S. opening with China in the 1970s, told a Thomson Reuters event last month that a high-level agreement between the two sides is needed. “If you take it case by case it will lead to accusations and counter-accusations,” he said.

UNOFFICIAL TALKS FIRST

But so far, there has been relatively little official movement.

The annual cabinet-level U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue included cyber security for the first time this year, but the session was just 90 minutes long, cut in half by translation and produced no breakthroughs.

The unofficial talks between experts began after China approached the United States with concerns that hacker intrusions were stoking bilateral tension, said James Lewis, a cybersecurity expert who leads the U.S. side of the talks.

The U.S. group and experts from the state-affiliated China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations have covered four areas: law enforcement, trade, military issues and espionage.

Five group meetings and three smaller informal meetings have made headway in the law enforcement area, said Lewis, of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think tank.

In one instance, the FBI helped China’s law enforcement agencies by staging raids in New York on Chinese in the United States who were defrauding people back home, he said.

“It’s slow, but I think there’s a little bit of progress,” said Lewis, adding that the goal is to eventually hand the conversations over to official negotiating teams.

SAME WEB, DIFFERENT DREAMS

But the military and espionage tracks have been hard going, highlighting what analysts say is a huge U.S.-China perception gap over values, capabilities, interests — and even basic definitions of deterrence and cyber security.

Analysts say China’s People’s Liberation Army believes its ability to attack U.S. cyber infrastructure compensates for its conventional military weakness compared to the United States.

“I’m quite skeptical of the likelihood that any effective understanding of offensive operations can be reached with the Chinese government,” said Stewart Baker, a former U.S. Department of Homeland Security official, now at the law firm Steptoe & Johnson.

China’s eagerness to acquire foreign technology also has inspired cyber intrusions that anger trade partners.

Hackers based in China have been accused of trying to steal everything from Google’s valuable search algorithm to manuals for U.S. satellites to gigabytes of proprietary business information from Western energy companies.

But China’s spymasters, paradoxically for a centrally controlled government, do not keep a tight leash on hackers and others that they train, said Lewis, whose group will hold its next round of unofficial cyber-security talks later this year.

Lewis said he was skeptical that Beijing was directing the high-value intellectual property theft or could stop it.

“They do train people and they do use proxies but that doesn’t mean that everyone is under their control,” he said.

Even if the United States could verify that China was behind malicious cyber activity and Beijing had the capacity to rein it in, negotiations toward a cyber treaty might require concessions Washington would be loathe to put on the table.

Jack Goldsmith, an international law and cyber-security expert at Harvard Law School, says China and other countries would likely demand U.S. restraint in areas such as intelligence gathering and encouraging political activists who challenge curbs on Internet freedom.

“Until the United States gets serious about which concessions that are attractive to our adversaries it is willing and able to make, American talk of a cyber-arms agreement is empty,” Goldsmith wrote recently.

 

via U.S. and China face vast divide on cyber issues | Reuters.